Occupational and Environmental Health - Social Life Science - Laboratories | Nagoya University GraduateSchool of Medicine

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Social Life ScienceOccupational and Environmental Health

Introduction

<Outline>
Our lab is focusing on the prevention of environmental factor-mediated diseases through elucidation of the mechanisms for the diseases using methods of fieldwork study including epidemiology and cutting-edge study of molecular biology as shown below.

< Molecular Biology Study >
 1. Molecular Oncology for melanoma
 2. Skin Biology using original model mice
 3. Neurophysiology for deafness and balance

< Fieldwork Study >
 4. Environmental Health Science for water polluted by toxic elements
 5. Epidemiology to investigate the effects of elements, noise and UV on human health

< Recruitment of graduate students from Asian and African countries>
We are recruiting graduate students who are interested in interdisciplinary research consisting of cutting-edge molecular biology study and fieldwork study including epidemiology. Candidates who have passed the selection of scholarship from Monbu-Kagakusho (MEXT) in Japan or their own country are especially welcome. Please do not hesitate to contact us because we are confident that we can provide you with a fruitful academic life in Japan.

Research Projects

Since the 21st century is the era of the environment, our research is focused on diseases caused by various environmental factors. Our research is also focused on the development of preventive therapy for environmental factor-mediated diseases thorough combined molecular biology study and fieldwork study.
Our research projects in five fields are presented below.

< Molecular Biology Study >
 1. Molecular Oncology for melanoma
 2. Skin Biology using original model mice
 3. Neurophysiology for deafness and balance

< Fieldwork Study >
 4. Environmental Health Science for water polluted by toxic elements
 5. Epidemiology to investigate the effects of elements, noise and UV on human health

< Outline of Molecular Biology Study >
1. Molecular Oncology for melanoma
Background: It has been reported that the incidence of skin melanoma is increasing at a greater rate than that of any other cancer due to the ozone depletion-mediated increase in UV light, indicating that melanoma is a typical disease induced by destruction of the global environment.
Our project: We have established a model mouse line for multi-step melanomagenesis via tumor-free, benign, premalignant, and malignant stages (Fig. 1). The mouse model (RET-mice) is being used worldwide as a representative animal model. If young researchers and graduate students wish to produce reports of high quality and to conduct research of cutting-edge molecular biology, conducting melanoma-related researches in our lab might be one way.

Fig. 1: RET-mice that spontaneously develop skin melanoma at high rates

project1.jpg

Histopathological appearances of hyperpigmented skin,
benign melanocytic tumor and melanoma the spontaneously developed in a stepwise manner in RET-mice.

Related publications

01. J Clin Invest 2009
02. Cancer Res 2010
03. J Exp Med 2010
04. J Clin Invest 2010
05. PLoS Biol 2011
06. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2011
07. Cancer Res 2011a;2011b
08. Cancer Res 2012
09. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2013
10. Nature Immunology 2014
11. Oncotarget 2015a;2015b;2015c
12. OncoImmunology 2015
13. Oncotarget 2016
14. OncoImmunology 2016
15. Oncoimmunology 2017
16. OncoImmunology 2018

< Outline of Molecular Biology Study >
2. Skin Biology using original model mice
Background: UV light and chemicals are potential risks for pigmented disorders in the skin. Model mice with cutaneous pigmented disorders could be strong tools to evaluate the health risks of UV light and chemicals.
Our project: We have established various model mouse lines with abnormalities of skin pigmentation including liver spots (Fig. 2), vitiligo (Cancer Res 2004) and hair graying (Fig. 3). We are developing molecular target therapies by analyzing the mechanisms in the model mice. Researchers and graduate students who are interested in the development of cosmetics using our original model mice are very welcome in our lab.

Fig. 2: Liver spot suspected skin disease
project2_en.jpg

Fig. 3: A model mouse for hair graying
project4.jpg
Representative kinetics of hair graying

Related publications

01. Mol Biol Cell 2000
02. Oncogene 2001
03. Cancer Res 2004
04. J Invest Dermatol 2006
05. J Invest Dermatol 2007
06. Arch Toxicol 2014a
07. Exp Dermatol 2016
08. Arch Toxicol 2016a;2016b
09. Chemosphere 2018
10. Chemosphere 2019

< Outline of Molecular Biology Study >
3. Neurophysiology for deafness and balance
Background: Impairments of hearing and balance are major problems in the field of occupational and environmental health. However, the mechanisms have not been fully clarified.
Our project: Our recent research using original genetically-modified mice focuses on novel molecules that regulate hearing and balance (Fig. 4). Moreover, we are examining target molecules for noise-induced deafness. Fortunately, we found candidate compounds that are useful for preventing noise-induced hearing loss, age-related hearing loss and impairment of balance in our animal studies. Thus, researchers and graduate students who are interested in neuroscience research on hearing and balance are very welcome in our lab.

Fig. 4: Physiological examinations for mice
project5.jpg project6.jpg
Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR)    Rotarod Performance Test

Related publications

01. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2010
02. J Biol Chem 2011
03. Neurobiol Aging 2012
04. PLoS ONE 2012
05. Neurotoxicol 2012
06. Arch Toxicol 2014b
07. Sciense Rep 2017
08. Front Behav Neurosci 2017
09. Toxicol Res 2017
10. Hearing Res 2018
11. Toxicol Sci 2018
12. Arch Toxixol 2019

< Outline of Fieldwork Study >
4. Environmental Health Science for toxic elements
Background: Toxic elements including arsenic in drinking water are a health risk in developing countries in Asia and Africa (Fig. 5). However, there are very limited cost-effective remediation systems for toxic elements in drinking water. Comprehensive study using knowledge and techniques in various fields including medicine, engineering and environmentology is required to solve this serious worldwide problem.
Our project: Our research is focused on (1) identification of the elements in well drinking water by using an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrophotometer, (2) evaluation of the health risks of elements in well drinking water, (3) development of a cost-effective and convenient remediation system for well drinking water, (4) practical realization of the remediation system in developing countries and (5) promotion of widespread use of the remediation system. Our ultimate goal is to contribute to health promotion in developing countries through providing safe drinking water. Our Environmental Health Science research to remediate toxic elements in well drinking water has started in various countries in Asia and Africa. Results of our research have been reported in various international papers as shown below. Since we are eager to further promote our Environmental Health Science Research to provide safe water for people in developing countries in Asia and Africa, we are recruiting Master and PhD students from Asian and African countries.

Fig. 5: Patients with arsenicosis
project7.jpg
 Hyperpigmented skin   Hyperkeratosis    Skin cancer
(Photographs provided by Dr. Shekhar in University of Dhaka, Bangladesh)

Related publications

01. Toxcol In Vitro 2011
02. Neurotoxicol 2012
03. Arch Toxicol 2012
04. Arch Toxicol 2013
05. PLoS ONE 2013
06. Arch Toxicol 2014
07. Environ Toxicol 2015
08. Environ Pollut 2015
09. J Invest Dermatol 2015
10. J Water Health 2016
11. Chemosphere 2016
12. Arch Toxicol 2017
13. Chemosphere 2018
14. Chemosphere 2019

< Outline of Fieldwork Study >
5. Epidemiology to investigate the effects of elements, noise and UV on human health
Background: Epidemiological research could be a strong tool to clarify the correlations between environmental factors and health in humans. Our recent research is focused on toxic elements, ultraviolet light and noise as environmental factors. Our recent research is also focused on skin disorders and hearing disorders as human diseases.
Our project: Various projects for occupational health as well as environmental health are being conducted in Asian countries including Japan. Our recent papers for epidemiological research have been rapidly increasing. Researchers and graduate students who are interested in fieldwork including epidemiological research in their own countries are very welcome in our lab.

Related publications

01. Toxicol Ind Health 2011
02. Cancer Epidemiol Biomaker Prevent 2011
03. Int J Environ Res Public Health 2013
04. PLoS ONE 2015
05. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol 2016
06. Toxicol Sci 2016
07. Chemosphere 2018
08. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol 2018
09. Biomarkers 2018
10. Sci Rep 2018
11. Sci Rep 2019

Faculty Members

FacultyPositionDepartment
Masashi KATO Professor Occupational and Environmental Health
Nobutaka OHGAMI Associate Professor Occupational and Environmental Health
Akira TAZAKI Lecturer Occupational and Environmental Health
Masayo AOKI Lecturer Occupational and Environmental Health

Bibliography

  • 2021
    1. Ohgami N, Iizuka A, Hirai H, Yajima I, Iida M, Shimada A, Tsuzuki T, Jijiwa M, Asai N, Takahashi M, Kato M. Loss-of-function mutation of c-Ret causes cerebellar hypoplasia in mice with Hirschsprung disease. J Biol Chem, in press, 2021
    2. Xu H, Ohgami N, Sakashita M, Ogi K, Hashimoto K, Tazaki A, Tong K, Aoki M, Fujieda S, Kato M. Intranasal levels of lead as an exacerbation factor for allergic rhinitis in humans and mice. J Allergy Clin Immunol in press, 2021
    3. Yuan T, Tazaki A, Hashimoto K, Al Hossain MMA, Kurniasaria F, Ohgamia N, Aoki M, Ahsand N, Akhand AA, Kato M. Development of an efficient remediation system with a low cost after identification of water pollutants including phenolic compounds in a tannery built-up area in Bangladesh. Chemosphere, in press
  • 2020
    1. Takeda K, Kawamoto Y, Nagasaki Y, Okuno Y, Goto Y, Iida M, Yajima I, Ohgami N, Kato M. Peptides containing the MXXCW motif inhibit oncogenic RET kinase activity with a novel mechanism of action. Am J Cancer Res 10(1):336-349, 2020
    2. Ninomiya H, Intoh A, Ishimine H, Onuma Y, Ito Y, Michiue T, Tazaki A, Kato M. Application of a human mesoderm tissue elongation system in vitro derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells to risk assessment for teratogenic chemicals. Chemosphere 250:126124, 2020
    3. 田崎啓、飯田真智子、加藤昌志. 発酵美容成分の開発 第1章(総論)皮膚色素異常のモデル動物とリスク評価 シーエムシー出版2020年
    4. Ohgami N, He T, Negishi-Oshino R, Gu Y, Xiang L, Kato M. A new method with an explant culture of the utricle for assessing the influence of exposure to low frequency noise on the vestibule. J Toxicol Environ Health A 83(5):215-218, 2020.
    5. Kato M, Ohgami N, Ohnuma S, Hashimoto K, Tazaki A, Xu H, Kondo-Ida L, Yuan T, Tsuchiyama T, He T, Kurniasari F, Gu Y, Chen W, Deng Y, Komuro K, Tong K, Yajima I. Multidisciplinary approach to assess the toxicities of arsenic and barium in drinking water. Environ Health Prev Med 25:16, 2020. (Review for award of Japanese Hygiene Society)
    6. Tsuchiyama T, Tazaki A, Al Hossain MM A, Yajima I, Ahsan N, Akhand AA, Hashimoto K, Ohgami N, Kato M. Increased levels of renal damage biomarkers caused by excess exposure to trivalent chromium in workers in tanneries. Environ Res 188:109770. 2020.
    7. Xu H, Hashimoto K, Maeda M, Azimi Mohammad Daud, Fayaz Said Hafizullah, Chen Wei, Hamajima N, Kato M. Boron promotes anchorage-independent growth of nontumorigenic cells. Environ Pollut 266(Pt 3):115094, 2020
    8. Sudo M, Hashimoto K, Yoshinaga M, Azimi MD, Fayaz SH, Hamajima N, Kondo-Ida L, Yanagisawa K, Kato M. Lithium promotes malignant transformation of nontumorigenic cells in vitro. Sci Total Environ 744:14080, 2020
    9. Iida M, Tazaki A, Yajima I, Ohgami N, Taguchi N, Goto Y, Kumasaka YM, Prevost-Blondel A, Kono M, Akiyama M, Takahashi M, Kato M. Hair graying with aging in mice carrying oncogenic RET. Aging Cell 19(11):e13273, 2020
  • 2019
    1. Kawamoto Y, Kondo H, Hasegawa M, Kurimoto C, Ishii Y, Kato C, Botei T, Shinya M, Murate T, Ueno Y, Kawabe M, Goto Y, Yamamoto R, Iida M, Yajima I, Ohgami N, Kato M, Takeda K. Inhibition of mast cell degranulation by melanin. Biochem Pharmacol 163:178-193, 2019. Mar
    2. Nomura K, Karita K, Araki A, Nishioka E, Muto G, Iwai-Shimada M, Nishikitani M, Inoue M, Tsurugano S, Kitano N, Tsuji M, Iijima S, Ueda K, Kamijima M, Yamagata Z, Sakata K, Iki M, Yanagisawa H, Kato M, Inadera H, Kokubo Y, Yokoyama K, Koizumi A, Otsuki T. For making a declaration of countermeasures against the falling birth rate from the Japanese Society for Hygiene: summary of discussion in the working group on academic research strategy against an aging society with low birth rate. Environ Health Prev Med 24(1):14, 2019. Mar
    3. Al Hossain A MM, Yajima I, Tazaki A, Xu H, Saheduzzaman M, Ohgami N, Ahsan N, Akhand AA, Kato M. Chromium-mediated hyperpigmentation of skin in male tannery workers in Bangladesh. Chemosphere in press, 2018.
    4. Chen W, Hashimoto K, Omata Y, Ohgami N, Tazaki A, Deng Y, Kondo-Ida L, Intoh A, Kato M. Adsorption of molybdenum by melanin. Environ Health Prev Med 24(1):36, 2019.
    5. Negishi-Oshino R, OhgamiN, He T, Ohgami K, Li X, Kato M. cVEMP correlated with imbalance in a mouse model of vestibular disorder. Environ Health Prev Med 24(1):36, 2019.
    6. He T, Ohgami N, Li X, Yajima I, Oshino R, Kato Y, Ohgami K, Xu Huadong, Ahsan N, Akhand AA, Kato M. Epidemiological analysis of hearing loss in humans drinking tube well water with high levels of iron. Sci Rep 9(1):9028, 2019.
    7. Iida M, Tazaki A, Deng Y, Chen Y, Yajima I, Kondo-Ida L, Hashimoto K, Ohgami N, Kato M. A unique system that can sensitively assess the risk of chemical leukoderma by using murine tail skin. Chemosphere 235:713-718, 2019.
    8. Deng Y, Ohgami N, Iida M, Tazaki A, Intoh A, Kondo-Ida L, Lu R, Tuzuki T, Yokoyama S, Kato M. Histological analysis of skin in Abca1-deleted mouse. Eur J Dermatol 29(5): 549-551, 2019.
    9. Negishi-Oshino R, Ohgami N, He T, Li X, Kato M, Kobayashi M, Gu Y, Komuro K, Angelidis CE, Kato M. Heat shock protein 70 is a key molecule to rescue imbalance caused by low-frequency noise. Arch Toxicol 93(11):3219-3228, 2019
  • 2018
    1. Das A, Sumit AF, Ahsan N, Kato M, Ohgami N, Akhand AA. Impairment of extra-high frequency auditory thresholds in subjects with elevated levels of fasting blood glucose. J Otol in press, 2018.
    2. Yajima I, Ahsan Nazmul, Akhand AA, Al Hossain A MM, Yoshinaga M, Ohgami N, Iida M, Oshino R, Naito M, Wakai K, Kato M. Arsenic levels in cutaneous appendicular organs are correlated with digitally evaluated hyperpigmented skin of the forehead but not the sole in Bangladesh residents. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol 28(1)64-8, 2018.
    3. Zhang X, Zong C, Zhang L, Garner E, Sugie S, Huang C, Wu W, Chang J, Sakurai T, Kato M, Ichihara S, Kumagai S, Ichihara G. Exposure of mice to 1, 2-dichloropropane induces CYP450-dependent proliferation and apoptosis of cholangiocytes. Toxicol Sci in press 2018.
    4. Yoshinaga M, Ninomiya H, Al Hossain MMA, Sudo M, Akhand AA, Ahsan N, Alim MA, Khalequzzaman M, Iida M, Yajima I, Ohgami N, Kato M. A comprehensive study including monitoring, assessment of health effects and development of a remediation method for chromium pollution. Chemosphere 201:667-675, 2018.
    5. Ninomiya H, Ohgami N, Oshino R, Kato M, Ohgami K, Li X, Shen D, Iida M, Yajima I, Angelidis C.E., Adachi H, Katsuno M, Sobue G, Kato M. Increased expression level of Hsp70 in the inner ears of mice by exposure to low frequency noise. Hearing Res in press 2018.
    6. Ohgami N, Li X, Yajima I, Oshino R, Ohgami K, Kato Y, Ahsan N, Akhand AA, Kato M. Manganese in toenails is associated with hearing loss at high frequencies in humans. Biomarkers in press, 2018.
    7. Li X, Ohgami N, Yajima I, Xu H, Iiida M, Ohino R, Ninomiya H, Shen D, Ahsan N, Akhand AA, Kato M. Arsenic level in toenails is associated with hearing loss in humans. PLoS ONE 2018.
    8. Douguet L, Bod L, Labarthe L, Lengagne R, Kato M, Couillin I, Pre?vost-Blondel A. Inflammation drives nitric oxide synthase 2 expression by γδ T cells and affects the balance between melanoma and vitiligo associated melanoma. OncoImmunology in press, 2018.
    9. Omata Y, Yoshinaga M, Yajima I, Ohgami N, Hashimoto K, Higashimura K, Tazaki A, Kato M. A disadvantageous effect of adsorption of barium by melanin on transforming activity. Chemosphere in press, 2018.
    10. Kobayashi T, Nakata K, Yajima I, Kato M, Tsurui H. Label-free imaging of melanoma with confocal photothermal microscopy: Differentiation between malignant and benign tissue. Bioengineering in press, 2018.
    11. Xu H, Ohgami N, He T, Hashimoto K, Tazaki Akira, Ohgami K, Takeda K, Kato M. Improvement of balance in young adults by a sound component at 100 Hz in music. Sci Rep in press, 2018.
  • 2017
    1. Bod L, Lengagne R, Wrobel L, Ramspott JP, Kato M, Avril M-F, Castellano F, Molinier-Frenkel V, Prevost-Blondel A. IL4-induced gene 1 promotes tumor growth by shaping the immune microenvironment in melanoma. OncoImmunology 6(3):e1278331, Jan, 2017.
    2. Zong C, Zhang X, Huang C, Chang J, Garner E, Sakurai T, Kato M, Ichihara S, Ichihara G. Role of cytochrome P450s in male reproductive toxicity of 1-bromopropane. Toxicol Res in press, 2017.
    3. Yajima I, Ahsan Nazmul, Akhand AA, Al Hossain A MM, Yoshinaga M, Ohgami N, Iida M, Oshino R, Naito M, Wakai K, Kato M. Arsenic levels in cutaneous appendicular organs are correlated with digitally evaluated hyperpigmented skin of the forehead but not the sole in Bangladesh residents. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol in press, 2017.
    4. Hattori Y, Naito M, Satoh M, Nakatochi M, Naito H, Kato M, Takagi S, Matsunaga T, Seiki T, Sasakabe T, Suma S, Kawai S, Okada R, Hishida A, Hamajima N, Wakai K. Response to the letter to the editor: Metallothionein MT2A A-5G polymorphism and the risk for chronic kidney disease and diabetes. Toxicol Sci in press, 2017. [comment]
    5. Ohgami N, Oshino R, Ninomiya H, Li X, Kato M, Yajima I, Kato M. Risk assessment of neonatal exposure to low frequency noise based on balance in mice. Front Behav Neurosci in press, 2017.
    6. Konishi H, Ohgami N, Matsushita A, Kondo Y, Aoyama Y, Kobayashi M, Nagai T, Ugawa S, Yamada K, Kato M, Kiyama H. Exposure to diphtheria toxin during the juvenile period impairs both inner and outer hair cells in C57BL/6 mice. Neuroscience 351:15-23, 2017.
    7. Barai M, Ahsan N, Paul N, Hossain K, Rashid M. Abdur, Kato M, Ohgami N, Akhad AA. Amelioration of arsenic-induced toxic effects in mice by dietary supplementation of Syzygium cumini leaf extract. Nagoya J Med Sci in press, 2017.
    8. Yajima I, Kumasaka MY, Iida M, Osino R, Tanihata H, Al Hossain A MM, Ohgami N, Kato M. Arsenic-mediated hyperpigmented skin via NF-kappa B/Endothelin1 signaling in an originally developed hairless mouse model. Arch Toxicol in press, 2017.
  • 2016
    1. Omata Y, Iida M, Yajima I, Ohgami N, Maeda M, Ninomiya H, et al. Modulated expression levels of tyrosine kinases in spontaneously developed melanoma by single irradiation of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology, 2016; 9: 1061-+.
    2. Kawamoto Y, Ueno Y, Nakahashi E, Obayashi M, Sugihara K, Qiao S, et al. Prevention of allergic rhinitis by ginger and the molecular basis of immunosuppression by 6-gingerol through T cell inactivation. The Journal of nutritional biochemistry, 2016; 27: 112-122.
    3. Kato M, Ninomiya H, Maeda M, Tanaka N, Ilmiawati C, Yoshinaga M. Commentary to Gorelenkova Miller and Mieyal (2015): sulfhydryl-mediated redox signaling in inflammation: role in neurodegenerative diseases. Archives of Toxicology, 2016; 90: 1017-1018.
    4. Kato M, Ninomiya H, Maeda M, Ilmiawati C, Al Hossain MMA, Yoshinaga M, et al. Reply to the commentary "To Gorelenkova Miller and Mieyal (2015): Sulfhydryl-mediated redox signaling in inflammation: role in neurodegenerative diseases" by Mieyal JJ. Archives of Toxicology, 2016; 90: 1523-1524.
    5. Iida M, Nakano C, Tamaki M, Hasegawa M, Tsuzuki T, Kato M. Different biological effects of a constant dose for single UVB irradiation with different intensities and exposure times. Experimental Dermatology, 2016; 25: 386-388.
    6. Goto Y, Yajima I, Kumasaka M, Ohgami N, Tanaka A, Tsuzuki T, et al. Transcription factor LSF (TFCP2) inhibits melanoma growth. Oncotarget, 2016; 7: 2379-2390.
    7. Dabbeche-Bouricha E, Araujo LM, Kato M, Prevost-Blondel A, Garchon H-J. Rapid dissemination of RET-transgene-driven melanoma in the presence of non-obese diabetic alleles: Critical roles of Dectin-1 and Nitric-oxide synthase type 2. Oncoimmunology, 2016; 5.
  • 2015
    1. Yajima I, Kumasaka MY, Ohnuma S, Ohgami N, Naito H, Shekhar HU, et al. Arsenite-Mediated Promotion of Anchorage-Independent Growth of HaCaT Cells through Placental Growth Factor. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 2015; 135: 1147-1156.
    2. Wu W, Ichihara G, Hashimoto N, Hasegawa Y, Hayashi Y, Tada-Oikawa S, et al. Synergistic Effect of Bolus Exposure to Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles on Bleomycin-Induced Secretion of Pro-Fibrotic Cytokines without Lasting Fibrotic Changes in Murine Lungs. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 2015; 16: 660-676.
    3. Thang ND, Yajima I, Ohnuma S, Ohgami N, Kumasaka MY, Ichihara G, et al. Enhanced Constitutive Invasion Activity in Human Nontumorigenic Keratinocytes Exposed to a Low Level of Barium for a Long Time. Environmental Toxicology, 2015; 30: 161-167.
    4. Thang ND, Yajima I, Kumasaka MY, Iida M, Suzuki T, Kato M. Deltex-3-like (DTX3L) stimulates metastasis of melanoma through FAK/PI3K/AKT but not MEK/ERK pathway. Oncotarget, 2015; 6: 14290-14299.
    5. Thang ND, Nghia PT, Kumasaka MY, Yajima I, Kato M. Treatment of vemurafenib-resistant SKMEL-28 melanoma cells with paclitaxel. Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention : APJCP, 2015; 16: 699-705.
    6. Tham M, Khoo K, Yeo KP, Kato M, Prevost-Blondel A, Angeli V, et al. Macrophage depletion reduces postsurgical tumor recurrence and metastatic growth in a spontaneous murine model of melanoma. Oncotarget, 2015; 6: 22857-22868.
    7. Tan KW, Evrard M, Tham M, Hong M, Huang C, Kato M, et al. Tumor stroma and chemokines control T-cell migration into melanoma following Temozolomide treatment. Oncoimmunology, 2015; 4.
    8. Sumit AF, Das A, Sharmin Z, Ahsan N, Ohgami N, Kato M, et al. Cigarette Smoking Causes Hearing Impairment among Bangladeshi Population. Plos One, 2015; 10.
    9. Sayed S, Ahsan N, Kato M, Ohgami N, Rashid A, Akhand AA. PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF PHYLLANTHUS EMBLICA LEAF EXTRACT ON SODIUM ARSENITE-MEDIATED ADVERSE EFFECTS IN MICE. Nagoya Journal of Medical Science, 2015; 77: 145-153.
    10. Ohgami N, Yamanoshita O, Thang ND, Yajima I, Nakano C, Wenting W, et al. Carcinogenic risk of chromium, copper and arsenic in CCA-treated wood. Environmental Pollution, 2015; 206: 456-460.
    11. Ohgami N, Iida M, Omata Y, Nakano C, Wenting W, Li X, et al. [Analysis of Environmental-Stress-Related Impairments of Inner Ear]. Nihon eiseigaku zasshi. Japanese journal of hygiene, 2015; 70: 100-104.
    12. Kumasaka MY, Yajima I, Iida M, Takahashi H, Inoue Y, Fukushima S, et al. Correlated expression levels of endothelin receptor B and Plexin C1 in melanoma. American Journal of Cancer Research, 2015; 5: 1117-1123.
    13. Kato M, Omata Y, Iida M, Y Kumasaka M, Ohgami N, Li X, et al. Development of Preventive Therapy by Clarification of Mechanisms of Environmental-Factor-Mediated Diseases. Nihon eiseigaku zasshi. Japanese journal of hygiene, 2015; 70: 176-180.
    14. Jia X, Harada Y, Tagawa M, Naito H, Hayashi Y, Yetti H, et al. Prenatal maternal blood triglyceride and fatty acid levels in relation to exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate: a cross-sectional study. Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine, 2015; 20: 168-178.
    15. Iida M, Omata Y, Nakano C, Yajima I, Tsuzuki T, Ishikawa K, et al. Decreased expression levels of cell cycle regulators and matrix metalloproteinases in melanoma from RET-transgenic mice by single irradiation of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology, 2015; 8: 9326-9331.
  • 2014
    1. Yanagishita T, Yajima I, Kumasaka M, Kawamoto Y, Tsuzuki T, Matsumoto Y, et al. Actin-Binding Protein, Espin: A Novel Metastatic Regulator for Melanoma. Molecular Cancer Research, 2014; 12: 440-446.
    2. Yanagishita T, Yajima I, Kumasaka M, Iida M, Xiang L, Tamada Y, et al. An Actin-Binding Protein Espin Is a Growth Regulator for Melanoma. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 2014; 134: 2996-2999.
    3. Yajima I, Kumasaka MY, Yamanoshita O, Zou C, Li X, Ohgami N, et al. GNG2 inhibits invasion of human malignant melanoma cells with decreased FAK activity. American Journal of Cancer Research, 2014; 4: 182-188.
    4. Yajima I, Iida M, Kumasaka MY, Omata Y, Ohgami N, Chang J, et al. Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas modulate cell cycle-related gene expressions in melanocytic tumors of RET-transgenic mice. Experimental Dermatology, 2014; 23: 424-425.
    5. Vegran F, Berger H, Boidot R, Mignot G, Bruchard M, Dosset M, et al. The transcription factor IRF1 dictates the IL-21-dependent anticancer functions of T(H)9 cells. Nature Immunology, 2014; 15: 758-66.
    6. Thang ND, Yajima I, Kumasaka MY, Kato M. Bidirectional Functions of Arsenic as a Carcinogen and an Anti-Cancer Agent in Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Plos One, 2014; 9.
    7. Tham M, Tan KW, Keeble J, Wang X, Hubert S, Barron L, et al. Melanoma-initiating cells exploit M2 macrophage TGF beta and arginase pathway for survival and proliferation. Oncotarget, 2014; 5: 12027-12042.
    8. Takeda K, Kawamoto Y, Iida M, Omata Y, Zou C, Kato M. Commentary to Pastore et al. (2014): Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in keratinocyte biology: implications for skin toxicity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Archives of Toxicology, 2014; 88: 2319-2320.
    9. Omata Y, Iida M, Yajima I, Takeda K, Ohgami N, Hori M, et al. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas as a novel candidate for preventive therapy of melanoma. Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine, 2014; 19: 367-369.
    10. Kumasaka MY, Yajima I, Ohgami N, Naito H, Omata Y, Kato M. Commentary to Krishna et al. (2014): Brain deposition and neurotoxicity of manganese in adult mice exposed via the drinking water. Archives of Toxicology, 2014; 88: 1185-1186.
    11. Jia X, Suzuki Y, Naito H, Yetti H, Kitamori K, Hayashi Y, et al. A Possible Role of Chenodeoxycholic Acid and Glycine-Conjugated Bile Acids in Fibrotic Steatohepatitis in a Dietary Rat Model. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 2014; 59: 1490-1501.
    12. Iida M, Yajima I, Ohgami N, Tamura H, Takeda K, Ichihara S, et al. The effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation on expression levels of matrix metalloproteinases in benign melanocytic tumors in RET-transgenic mice. European Journal of Dermatology, 2014; 24: 392-394.
    13. Chang J, Oikawa S, Iwahashi H, Kitagawa E, Takeuchi I, Yuda M, et al. Expression of proteins associated with adipocyte lipolysis was significantly changed in the adipose tissues of the obese spontaneously hypertensive/NDmcr-cp rat. Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, 2014; 6.
  • 2013
    1. Sevko A, Sade-Feldman M, Kanterman J, Michels T, Falk CS, Umansky L, et al. Cyclophosphamide Promotes Chronic Inflammation-Dependent Immunosuppression and Prevents Antitumor Response in Melanoma. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 2013; 133: 1610-1619.
    2. Sevko A, Michels T, Vrohlings M, Umansky L, Beckhove P, Kato M, et al. Antitumor Effect of Paclitaxel Is Mediated by Inhibition of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Chronic Inflammation in the Spontaneous Melanoma Model. Journal of Immunology, 2013; 190: 2464-2471.
    3. Pommier A, Audemard A, Durand A, Lengagne R, Delpoux A, Martin B, et al. Inflammatory monocytes are potent antitumor effectors controlled by regulatory CD4(+) T cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2013; 110: 13085-13090.
    4. Ohgami N, Iida M, Yajima I, Tamura H, Ohgami K, Kato M. Hearing impairments caused by genetic and environmental factors. Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine, 2013; 18: 10-15.
    5. Nizam S, Kato M, Yatsuya H, Khalequzzaman M, Ohnuma S, Naito H, et al. Differences in Urinary Arsenic Metabolites between Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Subjects in Bangladesh. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2013; 10: 1006-1019.
    6. Kumasaka MY, Yamanoshita O, Shimizu S, Ohnuma S, Furuta A, Yajima I, et al. Enhanced carcinogenicity by coexposure to arsenic and iron and a novel remediation system for the elements in well drinking water. Archives of Toxicology, 2013; 87: 439-447.
    7. Kato M, Kumasaka MY, Ohnuma S, Furuta A, Kato Y, Shekhar HU, et al. Comparison of Barium and Arsenic Concentrations in Well Drinking Water and in Human Body Samples and a Novel Remediation System for These Elements in Well Drinking Water. Plos One, 2013; 8.
    8. Helfrich I, Scheffrahn I, Bartling S, Weis J, von Felbert V, Middleton M, et al. Resistance to antiangiogenic therapy is directed by vascular phenotype, vessel stabilization, and maturation in malignant melanoma (vol 207, pg 491, 2010). Journal of Experimental Medicine, 2013; 210: 853.
  • 2012
    1. Yajima I, Uemura N, Nizam S, Khalequzzaman M, Thang ND, Kumasaka MY, et al. Barium inhibits arsenic-mediated apoptotic cell death in human squamous cell carcinoma cells. Archives of Toxicology, 2012; 86: 961-973.
    2. Yajima I, Kumasaka MY, Thang ND, Goto Y, Takeda K, Yamanoshita O, et al. RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and PI3K/PTEN/AKT Signaling in Malignant Melanoma Progression and Therapy. Dermatology research and practice, 2012; 2012: 354191.
    3. Yajima I, Kumasaka MY, Tamura H, Ohgami N, Kato M. Functional analysis of GNG2 in human malignant melanoma cells. Journal of Dermatological Science, 2012; 68: 172-178.
    4. Yajima I, Kumasaka MY, Naito Y, Yoshikawa T, Takahashi H, Funasaka Y, et al. Reduced GNG2 expression levels in mouse malignant melanomas and human melanoma cell lines. American Journal of Cancer Research, 2012; 2: 322-329.
    5. Thang ND, Yajima I, Nakagawa K, Tsuzuki T, Kumasaka MY, Ohgami N, et al. A novel hairless mouse model for malignant melanoma. Journal of Dermatological Science, 2012; 65: 207-212.
    6. Terme M, Ullrich E, Aymeric L, Meinhardt K, Coudert JD, Desbois M, et al. Cancer-Induced Immunosuppression: IL-18-Elicited Immunoablative NK Cells. Cancer Research, 2012; 72: 2757-2767.
    7. Tamura H, Ohgami N, Yajima I, Iida M, Ohgami K, Fujii N, et al. Chronic Exposure to Low Frequency Noise at Moderate Levels Causes Impaired Balance in Mice. Plos One, 2012; 7.
    8. Ohgami N, Tamura H, Ohgami K, Iida M, Yajima I, Kumasaka MY, et al. c-Ret-mediated hearing losses. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology, 2012; 5: 23-28.
    9. Ohgami N, Ida-Eto M, Sakashita N, Sone M, Nakashima T, Tabuchi K, et al. Partial impairment of c-Ret at tyrosine 1062 accelerates age-related hearing loss in mice. Neurobiology of Aging, 2012; 33.
    10. Ohgami N, Hori S, Ohgami K, Tamura H, Tsuzuki T, Ohnuma S, et al. Exposure to low-dose barium by drinking water causes hearing loss in mice. Neurotoxicology, 2012; 33: 1276-1283.
    11. Jayaraman P, Parikh F, Lopez-Rivera E, Hailemichael Y, Clark A, Ma G, et al. Tumor-Expressed Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Controls Induction of Functional Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells through Modulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Release. Journal of Immunology, 2012; 188: 5365-5376.
    12. Abschuetz O, Osen W, Frank K, Kato M, Schadendorf D, Umansky V. T-Cell Mediated Immune Responses Induced in ret Transgenic Mouse Model of Malignant Melanoma. Cancers, 2012; 4: 490-503.
  • 2011
    1. Yanagishita T, Hayashi R, Thang ND, Kato M, Shekhar HU, Yajima I, et al., Methods_S1.doc, in Figshare. 2011.
    2. Yanagishita T, Hayashi R, Thang ND, Kato M, Shekhar HU, Yajima I, et al., Figure_S2.tif, in Figshare. 2011.
    3. Yanagishita T, Hayashi R, Thang ND, Kato M, Shekhar HU, Yajima I, et al., Barium Promotes Anchorage-Independent Growth and Invasion of Human HaCaT Keratinocytes via Activation of c-SRC Kinase, in Figshare. 2011.
    4. Yajima I, Kumasaka MY, Thang ND, Goto Y, Takeda K, Iida M, et al. Molecular Network Associated with MITF in Skin Melanoma Development and Progression. Journal of skin cancer, 2011; 2011: 730170.
    5. Toh B, Wang X, Keeble J, Sim WJ, Khoo K, Wong W-C, et al. Mesenchymal Transition and Dissemination of Cancer Cells Is Driven by Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Infiltrating the Primary Tumor. Plos Biology, 2011; 9.
    6. Thang ND, Yajima I, Kumasaka MY, Ohnuma S, Yanagishita T, Hayashi R, et al. Barium Promotes Anchorage-Independent Growth and Invasion of Human HaCaT Keratinocytes via Activation of c-SRC Kinase. Plos One, 2011; 6.
    7. Terme M, Ullrich E, Aymeric L, Meinhardt K, Desbois M, Delahaye N, et al. IL-18 Induces PD-1-Dependent Immunosuppression in Cancer. Cancer Research, 2011; 71: 5393-5399.
    8. Taguchi N, Uemura N, Goto Y, Sakura M, Hara K, Niwa M, et al. ANTIOXIDATIVE EFFECTS OF CHERRY LEAVES EXTRACT ON tert-BUTYL HYDROPEROXIDE-MEDIATED CYTOTOXICITY THROUGH REGULATION OF THIOREDOXIN-2 PROTEIN EXPRESSION LEVELS. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health-Part a-Current Issues, 2011; 74: 1240-1247.
    9. Ohgami N, Tamura H, Kato M. c-Ret is a novel congenital deafness-related molecule. Neuroscience Research, 2011; 71: E352.
    10. Ohgami N, Kondo T, Kato M. Effects of light smoking on extra-high-frequency auditory thresholds in young adults. Toxicology and Industrial Health, 2011; 27: 143-147.
    11. Nakashima I, Kawamoto Y, Takeda K, Kato M. Control of genetically prescribed protein tyrosine kinase activities by environment-linked redox reactions. Enzyme research, 2011; 2011: 896567.
    12. Meyer C, Sevko A, Ramacher M, Bazhin AV, Falk CS, Osen W, et al. Chronic inflammation promotes myeloid-derived suppressor cell activation blocking antitumor immunity in transgenic mouse melanoma model. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2011; 108: 17111-17116.
    13. Lengagne R, Pommier A, Caron J, Douguet L, Garcette M, Kato M, et al. T Cells Contribute to Tumor Progression by Favoring Pro-Tumoral Properties of Intra-Tumoral Myeloid Cells in a Mouse Model for Spontaneous Melanoma. Plos One, 2011; 6.
    14. Kawakami T, Kumasaka M, Kato M, Mizoguchi M, Soma Y. BMP-4 down-regulates the expression of Ret in murine melanocyte precursors. Journal of Dermatological Science, 2011; 63: 66-69.
    15. Kato M, Kumasaka MY, Takeda K, Hossain K, Iida M, Yajima I, et al. L-cysteine as a regulator for arsenic-mediated cancer-promoting and anti-cancer effects. Toxicology in Vitro, 2011; 25: 623-629.
    16. Kato M, Iida M, Goto Y, Kondo T, Yajima I. Sunlight Exposure-Mediated DNA Damage in Young Adults. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 2011; 20: 1622-1628.
    17. Kato M, inventor Chubu University Educational Foundation, assignee. Model animal causing the white hair development and methods relating thereto patent 0098-1133;US 08067666. 2011 NOV 29 2011.
    18. Ida-Eto M, Ohgami N, Iida M, Yajima I, Kumasaka MY, Takaiwa K, et al. Partial Requirement of Endothelin Receptor B in Spiral Ganglion Neurons for Postnatal Development of Hearing. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2011; 286: 29621-29626.
    19. Hong M, Puaux A-L, Huang C, Loumagne L, Tow C, Mackay C, et al. Chemotherapy Induces Intratumoral Expression of Chemokines in Cutaneous Melanoma, Favoring T-cell Infiltration and Tumor Control. Cancer Research, 2011; 71: 6997-7009.
    20. Goto Y, Kato M. Inactive X chromosome-specific chromatin structures of the 5 ' flanking region of human escape gene, EIF2S3, II. Genes & Genetic Systems, 2011; 86: 414.
    21. Furukawa A, Kawamoto Y, Chiba Y, Takei S, Hasegawa-Ishii S, Kawamura N, et al. Proteomic identification of hippocampal proteins vulnerable to oxidative stress in excitotoxin-induced acute neuronal injury. Neurobiology of Disease, 2011; 43: 706-714.
  • 2010
    1. Ohshima Y, Yajima I, Takeda K, Iida M, Kumasaka M, Matsumoto Y, et al. c-RET Molecule in Malignant Melanoma from Oncogenic RET-Carrying Transgenic Mice and Human Cell Lines. Plos One, 2010; 5.
    2. Ohshima Y, Yajima I, Kumasaka MY, Yanagishita T, Watanabe D, Takahashi M, et al. CD109 expression levels in malignant melanoma. Journal of Dermatological Science, 2010; 57: 140-142.
    3. Ohgami N, Ida-Eto M, Shimotake T, Sakashita N, Sone M, Nakashima T, et al. c-Ret-mediated hearing loss in mice with Hirschsprung disease. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2010; 107: 13051-13056.
    4. Kumasaka MY, Yajima I, Hossain K, Iida M, Tsuzuki T, Ohno T, et al. A Novel Mouse Model for De novo Melanoma. Cancer Research, 2010; 70: 24-29.
    5. Kato M, Takeda K, Hossain K, Thang ND, Kaneko Y, Kumasaka M, et al. A Redox-Linked Novel Pathway for Arsenic-Mediated RET Tyrosine Kinase Activation. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 2010; 110: 399-407.
    6. Helfrich I, Scheffrahn I, Bartling S, Weis J, von Felbert V, Middleton M, et al. Resistance to antiangiogenic therapy is directed by vascular phenotype, vessel stabilization, and maturation in malignant melanoma. Journal of Experimental Medicine, 2010; 207: 491-503.
    7. Helfrich I, Scheffrahn I, Bartling S, Weis J, von Felbert F, Middleton M, et al. Resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy is directed by vascular phenotype, vessel stabilization and maturation in malignant melanoma. Experimental Dermatology, 2010; 19: 213.
    8. Helfrich I, Scheffrahn I, Bartling S, Weis J, Middleton M, Kato M, et al. The vascular phenotype, vessel stabilization and maturation affect the resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy in malignant melanoma. European Journal of Cell Biology, 2010; 89: 44.
    9. Eyles J, Puaux A-L, Wang X, Toh B, Prakash C, Hong M, et al. Tumor cells disseminate early, but immunosurveillance limits metastatic outgrowth, in a mouse model of melanoma. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2010; 120: 2030-2039.
    10. El Khoury D, Destouches D, Lengagne R, Krust B, Hamma-Kourbali Y, Garcette M, et al. Targeting a surface nucleolin with a multivalent pseudopeptide delays development of spontaneous melanoma in RET transgenic mice. Bmc Cancer, 2010; 10.
  • 2009
    1. Zhao F, Falk C, Osen W, Kato M, Schadendorf D, Umansky V. Activation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Drives Dendritic Cells to Become Tolerogenic in Ret Transgenic Mice Spontaneously Developing Melanoma. Clinical Cancer Research, 2009; 15: 4382-4390.
    2. Yajima I, Kumasaka M, Thang ND, Yanagishita T, Ohgami N, Kallenberg D, et al. Zinc finger protein 28 as a novel melanoma-related molecule. Journal of Dermatological Science, 2009; 55: 68-70.
    3. Lakshmikanth T, Burke S, Ali TH, Kimpfler S, Ursini F, Ruggeri L, et al. Receptor-mediated recognition of melanoma by NK cells and its implications for NK cell-based immunotherapy. Tissue Antigens, 2009; 73: 519-520.
    4. Lakshmikanth T, Burke S, Ali TH, Kimpfler S, Ursini F, Ruggeri L, et al. NCRs and DNAM-1 mediate NK cell recognition and lysis of human and mouse melanoma cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2009; 119: 1251-1263.
    5. Kimpfler S, Sevko A, Ring S, Falk C, Osen W, Frank K, et al. Skin Melanoma Development in ret Transgenic Mice Despite the Depletion of CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Regulatory T Cells in Lymphoid Organs. Journal of Immunology, 2009; 183: 6330-6337.
    6. Hossain K, Kawamoto Y, Hamada M, Akhand AA, Yanagishita T, Hoque MA, et al. 1,4-Butanediyl-bismethanethiosulfonate (BMTS) Induces Apoptosis Through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Mechanism. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 2009; 108: 1059-1065.
    7. Goto Y, Kato M. Screening and functional analysis of the tumor suppressor gene using melanoma model mice. Genes & Genetic Systems, 2009; 84: 443.
    8. Chi X, Michos O, Shakya R, Riccio P, Enomoto H, Licht JD, et al. Ret-Dependent Cell Rearrangements in the Wolffian Duct Epithelium Initiate Ureteric Bud Morphogenesis. Developmental Cell, 2009; 17: 199-209.
  • 2008
    1. Umansky V, Abschuetz O, Osen W, Ramacher M, Zhao F, Kato M, et al. Melanoma-Specific Memory T Cells Are Functionally Active in Ret Transgenic Mice without Macroscopic Tumors. Cancer Research, 2008; 68: 9451-9458.
    2. Lengagne R, Graff-Dubois S, Garcette M, Renia L, Kato M, Guillet J-G, et al. Distinct role for CD8 T cells toward cutaneous tumors and visceral metastases. Journal of Immunology, 2008; 180: 130-137.
    3. Kawakami T, Kimura S, Kawa Y, Kato M, Mizoguchi M, Soma Y. BMP-4 upregulates kit expression in mouse melanoblasts prior to the kit-dependent cycle of melanogenesis. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 2008; 128: 1220-1226.
    4. Kawakami T, Kawa Y, Kato M, Mizoguchi M, Soma Y. BMP signaling downregulates Ret expression in mouse melanoblasts but not melanoma cells. Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research, 2008; 21: 306-307.
    5. Kato M, Ohgami N, Yajima I, Kumasaka M, Yamanoshita O. Effect of hyperpigmented skin on ultraviolet-mediated cancer. Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research, 2008; 21: 323.
    6. Kato M, Hossain K, Iida M, Sato H, Uemura N, Goto Y. Arsenic enhances matrix metalloproteinase-14 expression in fibroblasts. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health-Part a-Current Issues, 2008; 71: 1053-1055.
  • 2007
    1. Kato M, Takeda K, Kawamoto Y, Hossain K, Ohgami N, Yanagishita T, et al. [Ultraviolet irradiation-mediated malignant melanoma induction with RET tyrosine kinase activation]. Nihon eiseigaku zasshi. Japanese journal of hygiene, 2007; 62: 3-8.
    2. Kato M, Ohgami N, Kawamoto Y, Tsuzuki T, Hossain K, Yanagishita T, et al. Protective effect of hyperpigmented skin on UV-mediated cutaneous cancer development. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 2007; 127: 1244-1249.
  • 2006
    1. Takeda K, Kawamoto Y, Okuno Y, Kato M, Takahashi M, Suzuki H, et al. A PKC-mediated backup mechanism of the MXXCW motif-linked switch for initiating tyrosine kinase activities. Febs Letters, 2006; 580: 839-843.
    2. Kato M, Takeda K, Kawamoto Y, Tsuzuki T, Kato Y, Ohno T, et al. Novel hairless RET-transgenic mouse line with melanocytic nevi and anagen hair follicles. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 2006; 126: 2547-2550.
    3. Graff-Dubois S, Lengagne R, Garcette M, Kato M, Nakashima I, Engelhard V, et al. CD8T cells do not prevent tumor outgrowth, but delay disease progression in a spontaneous melanoma model. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 2006; 126: 53.
  • 2005
    1. von Felbert V, Cordoba F, Weissenberger J, Vallan C, Kato M, Nakashima I, et al. Interleukin-6 gene ablation in a transgenic mouse model of malignant skin melanoma. American Journal of Pathology, 2005; 166: 831-841.
    2. Nakashima I, Takeda K, Kawamoto Y, Okuno Y, Kato M, Suzuki H, et al. MXXCW motif as a potential initiator of protein tyrosine kinases. Trends in Protein Research, 2005.
    3. Nakashima I, Takeda K, Kawamoto Y, Okuno Y, Kato M, Suzuki H. Redox control of catalytic activities of membrane-associated protein tyrosine kinases. Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 2005; 434: 3-10.
    4. Cordoba F, Braathen L, Weissenberger J, Vallan C, Kato M, Nakashima I, et al. 5-aminolaevulinic acid photodynamic therapy in a transgenic mouse model of skin melanoma. Experimental Dermatology, 2005; 14: 429-437.
  • 2004
    1. Lengagne R, Le Gal F, Garcette M, Fiette L, Ave P, Kato M, et al. Spontaneous vitiligo in an animal model for human melanoma: Role of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells. Cancer Research, 2004; 64: 1496-1501.
    2. Kubo M, Kambayashi Y, Kodama N, Takemoto K, Okuda J, Kato M, et al. The depletion of nitric oxide in atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. Nitric Oxide-Biology and Chemistry, 2004; 11: 101.
    3. Kawamoto Y, Takeda K, Okuno Y, Yamakawa Y, Ito Y, Taguchi R, et al. Identification of RET autophosphorylation sites by mass spectrometry. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2004; 279: 14213-14224.
    4. Kato M, Takeda K, Kawamoto Y, Tsuzuki T, Hossain K, Tamakoshi A, et al. c-Kit-targeting immunotherapy for hereditary melanoma in a mouse model. Cancer Research, 2004; 64: 801-806.
    5. Kambayashi Y, Kodama N, Kubo M, Okuda J, Takemoto K, Kato M, et al. Cytochrome c catalyzes nitration of tyrosine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and nitrite at various pH. Nitric Oxide-Biology and Chemistry, 2004; 11: 54.
    6. Hayashi H, Sone M, Ito S, Wakamatsu K, Kato M, Nakashima I, et al. A novel RFP-RET transgenic mouse model with abundant eumelanin in the cochlea. Hearing Research, 2004; 195: 35-40.
  • 2003
    1. Liu W, Akhand A, Takeda K, Kawamoto Y, Itoigawa M, Kato M, et al. Protein phosphatase 2A-linked and -unlinked caspase-dependent pathways for downregulation of Akt kinase triggered by 4-hydroxynonenal. Cell Death and Differentiation, 2003; 10: 772-781.
    2. Kato M, Wickner W. Vam10p defines a Sec18p-independent step of priming that allows yeast vacuole tethering. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2003; 100: 6398-6403.
    3. Kambayashi Y, Tero-Kubota S, Yamamoto Y, Kato M, Nakano M, Yagi K, et al. Formation of superoxide anion during ferrous ion-induced decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxide under aerobic conditions. Journal of Biochemistry, 2003; 134: 903-909.
    4. Hossain K, Akhand A, Kawamoto Y, Du J, Takeda K, Wu J, et al. Caspase activation is accelerated by the inhibition of arsenite-induced, membrane rafts-dependent Akt activation. Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 2003; 34: 598-606.
    5. Horie A, Hiki Y, Odani H, Yasuda Y, Takahashi M, Kato M, et al. IgA1 molecules produced by tonsillar lymphocytes are under-O-glycosylated in IgA nephropathy. American Journal of Kidney Diseases, 2003; 42: 486-496.
  • 2002
    1. Seeley E, Kato M, Margolis N, Wickner W, Eitzen G. Genomic analysis of homotypic vacuole fusion. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2002; 13: 782-794.
    2. Nakashima I, Takeda K, Kawamoto Y, Okuno Y, Kato M, Akhand A, et al. The highly conserved MXXCW motif initially switches on protein tyrosine kinase activity. Xi Biennial Meeting of the Society For Free Radical Research International, 2002: 229-234.
    3. Nakashima I, Takeda K, Kawamoto Y, Kato M, Akhand A, Suzuki H. A conserved cysteine residue in the catalytic domain plays a key role in activation of protein tyrosine kinase RET. Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 2002; 33: S88.
    4. Nakashima I, Suzuki H, Kato M, Akhand A. Redox control of T-cell death. Antioxidants & Redox Signaling, 2002; 4: 353-356.
    5. Nakashima I, Kato M, Akhand A, Suzuki H, Takeda K, Hossain K, et al. Redox-linked signal transduction pathways for protein tyrosine kinase activation. Antioxidants & Redox Signaling, 2002; 4: 517-531.
    6. Kato M, Takeda K, Kawamoto Y, Iwashita T, Akhand A, Senga T, et al. Repair by Src kinase of function-impaired RET with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A mutation with substitutions of tyrosines in the COOH-terminal kinase domain for phenylalanine. Cancer Research, 2002; 62: 2414-2422.
    7. Akhand A, Ikeyama T, Akazawa S, Kato M, Hossain K, Takeda K, et al. Evidence of both extra- and intracellular cysteine targets of protein modification for activation of RET kinase. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 2002; 292: 826-831.
    8. Akhand A, Du J, Liu W, Hossain K, Miyata T, Nagase F, et al. Redox-linked cell surface-oriented signaling for T-cell death. Antioxidants & Redox Signaling, 2002; 4: 445-454.
  • 2001
    1. Yamamoto M, Li M, Mitsuma N, Ito S, Kato M, Takahashi M, et al. Preserved phosphorylation of RET receptor protein in spinal motor neurons of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: an immunohistochemical study by a phosphorylation-specific antibody at tyrosine 1062. Brain Research, 2001; 912: 89-94.
    2. Wu J, Suzuki H, Zhou Y, Liu W, Yoshihara M, Kato M, et al. Cepharanthine activates caspases and induces apoptosis in Jurkat and K562 human leukemia cell lines. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 2001; 82: 200-214.
    3. Takeuchi K, Kato M, Suzuki H, Akhand A, Wu J, Hossain K, et al. Acrolein induces activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor of human keratinocytes for cell death. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 2001; 81: 679-688.
    4. Takeda K, Kato M, Wu J, Iwashita T, Suzuki H, Takahashi M, et al. Osmotic stress-mediated activation of RET kinases involves intracellular disulfide-bonded dimer formation. Antioxidants & Redox Signaling, 2001; 3: 473-482.
    5. Liu W, Kato M, Itoigawa M, Murakami H, Yajima M, Wu J, et al. Distinct involvement of NF-kappa B and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in serum deprivation-mediated stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and its inhibition by 4-hydroxynonenal. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 2001; 83: 271-280.
    6. Kato M, Wickner W. Ergosterol is required for the Sec18/ATP-dependent priming step of homotypic vacuole fusion. Embo Journal, 2001; 20: 4035-4040.
    7. Kato M, Takeda K, Kawamoto Y, Tsuzuki T, Dai Y, Nakayama S, et al. RET tyrosine kinase enhances hair growth in association with promotion of melanogenesis. Oncogene, 2001; 20: 7536-7541.
    8. Dai Y, Kato M, Takeda K, Kawamoto Y, Akhand A, Hossain E, et al. T-cell-immunity-based inhibitory effects of orally administered herbal medicine juzen-taiho-to on the growth of primarily developed melanocytic tumors in RET-transgenic mice. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 2001; 117: 694-701.
    9. Akhand A, Hossain K, Mitsui H, Kato M, Miyata T, Inagi R, et al. Glyoxal and methylglyoxal trigger distinct signals for map family kinases and caspase activation in human endothelial cells. Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 2001; 31: 20-30.
    10. Akhand A, Hossain K, Kato M, Miyata T, Du J, Suzuki H, et al. Glyoxal and methylglyoxal induce aggregation and inactivation of ERK in human endothelial cells. Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 2001; 31: 1228-1235.
  • 2000
    1. Liu W, Kato M, Akhand A, Hayakawa A, Suzuki H, Miyata T, et al. 4-hydroxynonenal induces a cellular redox status-related activation of the caspase cascade for apoptotic cell death. Journal of Cell Science, 2000; 113: 635-641.
    2. Kato M, Liu W, Akhand A, Hossain K, Takeda K, Takahashi M, et al. Ultraviolet radiation induces both full activation of ret kinase and malignant melanocytic tumor promotion in RFP-RET-Transgenic mice. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 2000; 115: 1157-1158.
    3. Kato M, Kato Y, Takeuchi K, Nakashima I. Local levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors in patients with allergic rhinitis are regulated by amount of antigen. Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, 2000; 126: 997-1000.
    4. Kato M, Iwashita T, Takeda K, Akhand A, Liu W, Yoshihara M, et al. Ultraviolet light induces redox reaction-mediated dimerization and superactivation of oncogenic Ret tyrosine kinases. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2000; 11: 93-101.
    5. Kato M, Iwashita T, Akhand AA, Liu W, Takeda K, Takeuchi K, et al. Molecular Mechanism of Activation and Superactivation of Ret Tyrosine Kinases by Ultraviolet Light Irradiation. Antioxidants & Redox Signaling, 2000; 2: 841-850.
    6. Kato M, Isobe K, Dai Y, Liu W, Takahashi M, Nakashima I. Further characterization of the Sho-saiko-to-mediated anti-tumor effect on melanoma developed in RET-transgenic mice. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 2000; 114: 599-601.
    7. Hossain K, Akhand A, Kato M, Du J, Takeda K, Wu J, et al. Arsenite induces apoptosis of murine T lymphocytes through membrane raft-linked signaling for activation of c-Jun amino-terminal kinase. Journal of Immunology, 2000; 165: 4290-4297.
    8. Dragani T, Peissel B, Zanesi N, Aloisi A, Dai Y, Kato M, et al. Mapping of melanoma modifier loci in RET transgenic mice. Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, 2000; 91: 1142-1147.
  • 1999
    1. Suzuki H, Zhou Y, Kato M, Mak T, Nakashima I. Normal regulatory alpha/beta T cells effectively eliminate abnormally activated T cells lacking the interleukin 2 receptor beta in vivo. Journal of Experimental Medicine, 1999; 190: 1561-1571.
    2. Parashar A, Akhand A, Rawar R, Furuno T, Nakanishi M, Kato M, et al. Mercuric chloride induces increases in both cytoplasmic and nuclear free calcium ions through a protein phosphorylation-linked mechanism. Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 1999; 26: 227-231.
    3. Oh C, Kim Y, Eun J, Yokoyama T, Kato M, Nakashima I. Induction of T lymphocyte apoptosis by treatment with glycyrrhizin. American Journal of Chinese Medicine, 1999; 27: 217-226.
    4. Liu W, Akhand A, Kato M, Yokoyama I, Miyata T, Kurokawa K, et al. 4-hydroxynonenal triggers an epidermal growth factor receptor-linked signal pathway for growth inhibition. Journal of Cell Science, 1999; 112: 2409-2417.
    5. Kitamura T, Tamada Y, Kato M, Yokochi T, Ikeya T. Soluble E-selectin as a marker of disease activity in pustulosis palmaris et plantaris. Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 1999; 79: 462-464.
    6. Kato M, Nozaki Y, Yoshimoto T, Tamada Y, Kageyama M, Yamashita T, et al. Different serum soluble Fas levels in patients with allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma. Allergy, 1999; 54: 1299-1302.
    7. Kato M, Liu W, Akhand A, Dai Y, Ohbayashi M, Tuzuki T, et al. Linkage between melanocytic tumor development and early burst of Ret protein expression for tolerance induction in metallothionein-I ret transgenic mouse lines. Oncogene, 1999; 18: 837-842.
    8. Kato M, Hattori T, Kato Y, Matsumoto Y, Yamashita T, Nakashima I. Elevated soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor levels in seasonal allergic rhinitis patients. Allergy, 1999; 54: 278-282.
    9. Kato M, Hattori T, Ito H, Kageyama M, Yamashita T, Nitta Y, et al. Serum-soluble Fas levels as a marker to distinguish allergic and nonallergic rhinitis. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 1999; 103: 1213-1214.
    10. Kato M. Establishment of a spontaneously malignant melanoma-developing transgenic mouse line. Pigment Cell Research, 1999: 41.
    11. Iwashita T, Kato M, Murakami H, Asai N, Ishiguro Y, Ito S, et al. Biological and biochemical properties of Ret with kinase domain mutations identified in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma. Oncogene, 1999; 18: 3919-3922.
    12. Asai M, Kato M, Asai N, Iwashita T, Murakami H, Kawai K, et al. Differential regulation of MMP-9 and TIMP-2 expression in malignant melanoma developed in Metallothionein/RET transgenic mice. Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, 1999; 90: 86-92.
    13. Akhand A, Pu M, Senga T, Kato M, Suzuki H, Miyata T, et al. Nitric oxide controls Src kinase activity through a sulfhydryl group modification-mediated Tyr-527-independent and Tyr-416-linked mechanism. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 1999; 274: 25821-25826.
    14. Akhand A, Kato M, Suzuki H, Liu W, Du J, Hamaguchi M, et al. Carbonyl compounds cross-link cellular proteins and activate protein-tyrosine kinase p60(c-Src). Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 1999; 72: 1-7.
  • 1998
    1. Liu W, Kato M, Akhand A, Hayakawa A, Takemura M, Yoshida S, et al. The herbal medicine sho-saiko-to inhibits the growth of malignant melanoma cells by upregulating Fas-mediated apoptosis and arresting cell cycle through downregulation of cyclin dependent kinases. International Journal of Oncology, 1998; 12: 1321-1326.
    2. Kato M, Tamada Y, Kageyama M, Yamashita T, Nitta Y, Ikeya T, et al. Elevated soluble Fas levels in herpes zoster patients. British Journal of Dermatology, 1998; 139: 357-358.
    3. Kato M, Takahashi M, Akhand A, Liu W, Dai Y, Shimizu S, et al. Transgenic mouse model for skin malignant melanoma. Oncogene, 1998; 17: 1885-1888.
    4. Kato M, Liu W, Yi H, Asai N, Hayakawa A, Kozaki K, et al. The herbal medicine Sho-saiko-to inhibits growth and metastasis of malignant melanoma primarily developed in ret-transgenic mice. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 1998; 111: 640-644.
    5. Kato M, Hattori T, Liu W, Nakashima I. Evidence of potential regulation by interleukin-4 of the soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 level in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis under provocation by a small amount of natural allergen. Annals of Otology Rhinology and Laryngology, 1998; 107: 232-235.
    6. Akhand A, Kato M, Suzuki H, Miyata T, Nakashima I. Level of HgCl2-mediated phosphorylation of intracellular proteins determines death of thymic T-lymphocytes with or without DNA fragmentation. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 1998; 71: 243-253.
  • 1997
    1. Xu X, Yi H, Kato M, Suzuki H, Kobayashi S, Takahashi H, et al. Differential sensitivities to hyperbaric oxygen of lymphocyte subpopulations of normal and autoimmune mice. Immunology Letters, 1997; 59: 79-84.
    2. Ohkusu K, Du J, Isobe K, Yi H, Akhand A, Kato M, et al. Protein kinase C alpha-mediated chronic signal transduction for immunosenescence. Journal of Immunology, 1997; 159: 2082-2084.
    3. Nakashima I, Pu M, Akhand A, Kato M, Suzuki H. Chemical events in signal transduction. Immunology Today, 1997; 18: 362.
    4. Matsumoto Y, Kato M, Tamada Y, Mori H, Ohashi M. Enhancement of interleukin-1 alpha mediated autocrine growth of cultured human keratinocytes by Sho-saiko-to. Japanese Journal of Pharmacology, 1997; 73: 333-336.
    5. Akhand A, Pu M, Du J, Kato M, Suzuki H, Hamaguchi M, et al. Magnitude of protein tyrosine phosphorylation-linked signals determines growth versus death of thymic T lymphocytes. European Journal of Immunology, 1997; 27: 1254-1259.
  • 1996
    1. Pu M, Akhand A, Kato M, Koike T, Hamaguchi M, Suzuki H, et al. Mercuric chloride mediates a protein sulfhydryl modification-based pathway of signal transduction for activating Src kinase which is independent of the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of a carboxyl terminal tyrosine. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 1996; 63: 104-114.
    2. Pu M, Akhand A, Kato M, Hamaguchi M, Koike T, Iwata H, et al. Evidence of a novel redox-linked activation mechanism for the Src kinase which is independent of tyrosine 527-mediated regulation. Oncogene, 1996; 13: 2615-2622.
    3. Kato M, Hattori T, Matsumoto Y, Nakashima I. Dynamics of soluble adhesion molecule levels in patients with pollinosis. Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, 1996; 122: 1398-1400.
    4. Kato M, Hattori T, Ikeda R, Yamamoto J, Yamashita T, Yanagita N, et al. Amount of pollen has an effect on the systemic and local levels of soluble ICAM-1 in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. Allergy, 1996; 51: 128-132.
  • 1995
    1. ZHANG Y, KATO M, ISOBE K, HAMAGUCHI M, YOKOCHI T, NAKASHIMA I. DISSOCIATED CONTROL BY GLYCYRRHIZIN OF PROLIFERATION AND IL-2 PRODUCTION OF MURINE THYMOCYTES. Cellular Immunology, 1995; 162: 97-104.
    2. MA L, PU M, AKHAND A, OHATA N, OHKUSU K, KATO M, et al. MULTIPHASIC MODULATION OF SIGNAL-TRANSDUCTION INTO T-LYMPHOCYTES BY MONOIODOACETIC ACID AS A SULFHYDRYL REAGENT. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 1995; 59: 33-41.
    3. KATO M, PU M, ISOBE K, HATTORI T, YANAGITA N, NAKASHIMA I. CELL TYPE-ORIENTED DIFFERENTIAL MODULATORY ACTIONS OF SAIKOSAPONIN-D ON GROWTH-RESPONSES AND DNA FRAGMENTATION OF LYMPHOCYTES TRIGGERED BY RECEPTOR-MEDIATED AND RECEPTOR-BYPASSED PATHWAYS. Immunopharmacology, 1995; 29: 207-213.
    4. KATO M, HATTORI T, KITAMURA M, BEPPU R, YANAGITA N, NAKASHIMA I. SOLUBLE IGAM-1 AS A REGULATOR OF NASAL ALLERGIC REACTION UNDER NATURAL ALLERGEN PROVOCATION. Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 1995; 25: 744-748.
    5. KATO M, HATTORI T, KITAMURA M, BEPPU R, YANAGITA N, NAKASHIMA I. MAJOR BASIC-PROTEIN AND TOPICAL ADMINISTRATION OF KETOTIFEN IN POLLINOSIS UNDER NATURAL ALLERGEN PROVOCATION. Orl-Journal For Oto-Rhino-Laryngology and Its Related Specialties, 1995; 57: 269-272.
    6. ICHIHARA M, IWAMOTO T, ISOBE K, TAKAHASHI M, NAKAYAMA A, PU M, et al. ONCOGENE-LINKED IN-SITU IMMUNOTHERAPY OF PRE-B LYMPHOMA ARISING IN E-MU/RET TRANSGENIC MICE. British Journal of Cancer, 1995; 71: 808-813.
  • 1994
    1. KATO M, PU M, ISOBE K, IWAMOTO T, NAGASE F, LWIN T, et al. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE IMMUNOREGULATORY ACTION OF SAIKOSAPONIN-D. Cellular Immunology, 1994; 159: 15-25.
    2. KATO M, HATTORI T, TAKAHASHI M, YANAGITA N, NAKASHIMA I. EOSINOPHIL CATIONIC PROTEIN AND PROPHYLACTIC TREATMENT IN POLLINOSIS IN NATURAL ALLERGEN PROVOCATION. British Journal of Clinical Practice, 1994; 48: 299-301.
  • 1993
    1. ZHANG Y, ISOBE K, NAGASE F, LWIN T, KATO M, HAMAGUCHI M, et al. GLYCYRRHIZIN AS A PROMOTER OF THE LATE SIGNAL-TRANSDUCTION FOR INTERLEUKIN-2 PRODUCTION BY SPLENIC LYMPHOCYTES. Immunology, 1993; 79: 528-534.
    2. NAKASHIMA I, PU M, HAMAGUCHI M, IWAMOTO T, RAHMAN S, ZHANG Y, et al. PATHWAY OF SIGNAL DELIVERY TO MURINE THYMOCYTES TRIGGERED BY CO-CROSS-LINKING CD3 AND THY-1 FOR CELLULAR DNA FRAGMENTATION AND GROWTH-INHIBITION. Journal of Immunology, 1993; 151: 3511-3520.
  • 1992
    1. NAKASHIMA I, YOSHIDA T, ZHANG Y, PU M, TAGUCHI R, IKEZAWA H, et al. T-CELL MATURATION STAGE-LINKED HETEROGENEITY OF THE GLYCOSYLPHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL MEMBRANE ANCHOR OF THY-1. Immunobiology, 1992; 185: 466-474.
    2. NOBUTAKA O, MASASHI K, inventors; UNIV NAGOYA NAT CORP, assignee. Agent used as pharmaceutical, quasi-drug, or foodstuff preventing and/or treating acoustic disturbance or cerebellar-ataxia, comprises Hedgehog signal transduction system activation agent patent WO2014084085-A1.
    3. M K, M K, inventors; UNIV NAGOYA, assignee. New genetically modified rodent useful for screening effectiveness of substance for preventing and/or treating de-novo cancer, obtained by deleting hetero-type endotherin receptor B gene and introducing ret proto-oncogene patent JP5481619-B2.
    4. M K, M I, inventors; GH MIURA GAKUEN, assignee. New hairless rodent genetically modified animal useful as model for retarding pigmentation e.g. chloasma, obtained by transferring activated rearranged during transfection proto-oncogene gene and having melanin production ability patent JP2013106554-A.
    5. M K, I Y, M H, H K, K T, H K, inventors; UNIV NAGOYA, assignee. Melanoma treatment apparatus comprises counter electrode pair by which recessed portion is formed in opposing surface of electrode, and gas introduction port introduces gas makes housing to generate plasma patent JP2013153972-A.
    6. KATO M J, OKAMI N J, TAKAHASHI M J, ASAI N J, JIJIWA M J, inventors; UNIV NAGOYA, assignee. New genetically modified rodent used as animal model for screening substance capable of treating hearing loss and congenital deafness, obtained by carrying out dysfunction of one allele of Ret gene and activating Ret protein patent JP5531198-B2.

Research Keywords

skin cancer、 melanoma、 SCC、 hyper-pigmented skin、 vitiligo、 liver spots、 gray hair、 alopecia、 fieldwork、 epidemiology、 heavy metal、 remediation、 arsenicosis、 health risk assessment、 prevention

Recruitment of graduate students and young scientists

We have experience in performing research with graduate students from various countries including China, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Taiwan and Egypt. Therefore, we can positively accept graduate students (Master and PhD courses) from Asian and African countries as well as Japan. In fact, there are many foreign graduate students in our lab at present.

1) For candidates who are interested in Molecular Biology: Research of Molecular Biology in the fields of Oncology, Neurophysiology and Skin Biology using original model mice is possible in our lab.

2) For candidates who are interested in Environmental Health and Epidemiology: Research of Occupational and Environmental Health for water polluted by toxic elements and Epidemiology to investigate the effects of heavy metals, noise and UV light on human health is possible in our lab.

If you are interested in our research projects, please contact us by the email below. Candidates who have passed the selection of a scholarship from Monbu-Kagaku-Sho (MEXT) in Japan or their own country are especially welcome.

Masashi Kato, MD, PhD,
Professor and Chair,
Department of Occupational and Environmental Health,
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan.
oeh-office[a]med.nagoya-u.ac.jp
*please change [a] to @ when you contact us.